Being a Barefaced Woman

In recent years, being a barefaced woman has become somewhat trendy. We’ve all seen the #nomakeupselfies become increasingly popular on Instagram. Heck, there’s even a National No Makeup Day.

Some celebrities like Alicia Keys have spoken eloquently on the topic and helped make the #nomakeup movement what it is today.

Like most (if not all) of the choices a woman can make about her body, putting on makeup or foregoing it is a source of debate and controversy.

Whether you’re on team #makeup or #nomakeup it doesn’t matter, someone somewhere will think you’re wrong.

I’m not here to be that person.

All I can talk about is my experience. The personal is political.

If there’s one thing I remember from feminist theory it’s exactly that.

There is no right or wrong choice but adding our voices to the collective discussion can help other women to be more confident in making the right decision for them.

When it comes to making decisions on how we want to present ourselves to society fear is sadly a major influence.

It was for me.

Even though I have been a barefaced woman for more than 3 years now I was never a barefaced girl.

From ages 12 to 18 the thought of going barefaced terrified me.

No, that’s not exactly right.

The thought of what would happen if I went barefaced terrified me.

Because let’s be real, there’s nothing scary about ditching the time-intensive routine of “prettyfication”.

What’s scary is the fact that we know all too well that for every action, there’s a reaction.

The first obvious one is our own.

I couldn’t bare looking at myself in the mirror if I didn’t like what I saw.

The second obvious reaction is other people’s reaction.

That’s usually where things go wrong.

I mean if you’re alone all day all you have to do is avoid mirrors. Going out into the world, other human eyes put mirrors to shame.

Going out into the world, inhumane eyes put you to shame.

That’s what I was afraid of.

I didn’t want to see that I was ugly. That reflection of me in other people’s eyes scared me and that fear informed my decision to put makeup on.

People often say that makeup is a mask. That women use it to hide themselves. As if it was an act of deceit.

I used it as a shield.

As a girl there was some battles I wasn’t ready for.

I wish being barefaced wasn’t seen as a courageous feat to be celebrated.

But in many ways it is.

I wish my decision to be a barefaced woman was just that, my decision, but I don’t think it is.

It’s a lot more.

I’m not a celebrity, I don’t have flawless skin, I don’t have a special glow or the kind of “natural beauty” that you find in usual #nomakeupselfies on social media.

I’m a one of a kind woman. I have a lot more to show than tired eyes and slightly dry skin.

I never see women like me on the bus or walking down the street.

But I don’t care.

Going without makeup shouldn’t be a privilege that only women with flawless skin get to enjoy.

That’s why I’m a barefaced woman.

Are you a barefaced woman too? What do you think of the #nomakeup movement?

I’d love to know your thoughts.

*Photo Credit: Larry flickr Creative Commons 2.0

One thought on “Being a Barefaced Woman

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